May 27, 2022

An abusive child who was abused and beaten by monks as a child has won a record 1.4 million in damages.

The survivor, now 54, described yesterday how the settlement finally “acknowledged” the punishment for his sexual abuse.

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Abusive AB wins £ 1.4m in damages for tampering with monks (stock image)Credit: Getty
Brother John Ferrell was convicted of four counts of rape and sentenced to five years in prison.

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Brother John Ferrell was convicted of four counts of rape and sentenced to five years in prison.Credit: PA
The bomber struck shortly after noon in front of a crowded school.

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The bomber struck shortly after noon in front of a crowded school.

And he hopes it will allow him to move on after decades of suffering.

The man, known only as AB, was teased by former brothers William Ryan, Paul Kelly and John Farrell in February 1980, at the age of 12, after attending St. Ninen School in Falkland, Fife. Was teased

He said of his historic cash prize: “I have been recognized and now I can slowly look to the future instead of being stuck in my past.

“Finally, almost 40 years later, I have been recognized.”

The victim – whose name cannot be disclosed for legal reasons – was abused, molested and beaten by the three brothers and forced to watch the attacks on other children.

AB, who dropped out of school in April 1981, kept his trial secret until November 2013, when he spoke to police.

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About three years later, in Glasgow High Court, Brother Ferrell was convicted of four counts of rape and sentenced to five years in prison.

Brother Kelly was sentenced to six years in prison for six counts of rape. Brother Ryan died in 2013 before he could be questioned.

The Christian Brothers, a religious group that runs the school, was ordered to pay damages to the victim, despite trying to settle the case.

“This settlement is really a milestone for survivors everywhere,” said Kim Leslie of law firm Dugby Brown.



AB said: “I have been living in my mind for 30 years. I was hiding all my emotions.

“If there was anything abusive on TV, I would go to the toilet and hide so that no one would see the reaction on my face.

“So when I finally spoke to the police, there was a strange ambiguity in everything.

“It was terrible but powerful. Tiring but liberating. Painful but curable.”

He added: “I am not alone. I am supporting. I have been identified.”

Proponents of her case have been working to make the actual transcript of this statement available online.

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